Timezones

A timezone refers to any of the 24 regions loosely divided by longitude and which keep the same time standard.

Getting Started

In JavaScript, the Date object represents a single moment in time that is measured in the number of milliseconds since 01 January, 1970 UTC. The Date objects are always created by using the current browser timezone offset.

To construct a new Date object, set new Date(2014,1,1,12,0,0);. The result in the browser console shows that your current timezone offset is already applied and is Sat Feb 01 2014 12:00:00 GMT+0200 (FLE Standard Time). If you try to convert the previously created JavaScript Date to a JSON string by using the JSON.stringify method, the result will be ""2014-02-01T10:00:00.000Z"".

Basic Configuration

You can define a timezone option in the Scheduler. It indicates to the widget what timezone to apply for displaying its appointment dates. By default, the timezone option is not set and, therefore, the event dates will be created based on the current client timezone offset. This means that users from different timezones will see different start and end times. On the other hand, setting the Scheduler timezone will force the widget to display the same start and end times regardless of the user timezone.

  • When you use remote binding, the Scheduler expects to receive UTC dates. Respectively, it will send them back to the server in UTC. The service in use is responsible for keeping the dates in UTC, without offsetting them against its local time.
  • When you bind the Scheduler to a remote service, keep the timezone option always set to, for example, "Etc/UTC".
  • When the timezone option of the Scheduler is not set, the current system timezone offset is used.
  • The recommended Date format for sending and receiving Scheduler event dates is ISO 8601 with a Z zone designator (UTC date). The same format is used by the JSON.stringify method, which converts JavaScript Date objects to JSON strings.

Reading Events from the DataSource

Based on the specifics of the JavaScript Date object, the Scheduler needs to adjust the dates of the events when reading them.

  • The Scheduler creates SchedulerEvent instances where start and end dates are instantiated as JavaScript Date objects. During the process, the dates will be offset against the local time.
  • If the timezone option is defined, the widget will remove the local timezone offset and will convert dates to UTC. Then, it will apply the defined timezone value, for example, America/New_York.

Sending Events to the Remote Service

Based on the specifics of the JavaScript Date object, the Scheduler needs to adjust the dates of the events when sending them.

  • If the timezone option is defined, the widget will remove the applied timezone offset, for example, America/New_York and will convert dates to UTC. Then, it will apply the local time.
  • The Scheduler serializes SchedulerEvent instances by using JSON.stringify. In the process, the dates are converted to UTC and then formatted according to the ISO8601 format.

Schedulers with a No-Timezone Option

If you do not define a timezone option, your system timezone settings will apply by default. You can still customize the timezone settings so that you can deliver an appointment date either in the local offset or in UTC.

When you use formats for parsing UTC date strings, apply the zzz specifier to render the local time. Otherwise, the current browser timezone offset will apply.

The following example demonstrates how to bind the Scheduler to local dates when the timezone option is not set. If you run it, the Scheduler will show the dates in the local timezone offset. This means that the event will be displayed as scheduled for 2:00pm, regardless of your location—whether you are in the Europe/Berlin timezone, for instance, or in the Europe/Sofia one.

    <div id="scheduler"></div>
    <script>
    $(function() {
        $("#scheduler").kendoScheduler({
            date: new Date("2013/6/13"),
            startTime: new Date("2013/6/13 10:00"),
            endTime: new Date("2013/6/13 23:00"),
            height: 600,
            views: ["day"],
            editable: false,
            dataSource: [
                {
                    title: "The Internship",
                    image: "../content/web/scheduler/the-internship.jpg",
                    imdb: "http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2234155/",
                    start: new Date("2013/6/13 14:00"),
                    end: new Date("2013/6/13 15:30")
                }
            ]
        });
    });
    </script>

The following example demonstrates how to bind the Scheduler to UTC dates when the timezone option is not set. If you run it, the Scheduler will show the dates according to the UTC convention. This means that the event will be displayed as scheduled for 4:00pm if you are in the Europe/Berlin timezone, for instance, while if you are in the Europe/Sofia timezone, the event will appear as scheduled for 5:00pm.

    <div id="scheduler"></div>
    <script>
    $(function() {
        $("#scheduler").kendoScheduler({
            date: new Date("2013/6/13"),
            startTime: new Date("2013/6/13 10:00"),
            endTime: new Date("2013/6/13 23:00"),
            height: 600,
            views: ["day"],
            editable: false,
            dataSource: [
                {
                    title: "The Internship",
                    image: "../content/web/scheduler/the-internship.jpg",
                    imdb: "http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2234155/",
                    start: new Date("2013-06-13T14:00:00.000Z"),
                    end: new Date("2013-06-13T15:30:00.000Z")
                }
            ]
        });
    });
    </script>

See Also

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